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Search Results 1 - 14 of 14


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Kawatake Mokuami (1816–1893)

A playwright at the end of the Edo period and throughout much of the Meiji period, Kawatake Mokuami wrote over 360 plays during his fifty-year…

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Katsureki-mono

“Living history” plays were historical kabuki plays produced during the Meiji period 10s and 20s (1868–1888) in an attempt to reform the practices associated with…

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Shingeki

Shingeki (literally “new theater”) is a word coined in late Meiji period Japan (1868–1912) referring to dramatic works and theater performance styles imported and adapted…

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Aoki, Shigeru [青木繁] (1882–1911)

Aoki Shigeru, a Japanese painter active during the Meiji period, is noted for his combination of Western-style (yōga) painting with indigenous Japanese subjects (Nihonga). He…

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Asai, Chû (浅井忠) (1856–1907)

Asai Chû was a leading Yôga (Western-style painting) artist during the Meiji period. Asai began learning Kachô-ga (花鳥画, Japanese bird and flower paintings) from the…

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Shin Kabuki

Shin Kabuki literally “new kabuki,” a modern outgrowth of traditional kabuki and one of the fruits of Japan’s modernist theater movement.

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Nihonga

Nihonga refers to Japanese-style painting that uses mineral pigments, and occasionally ink, together with other organic pigments on silk or paper. It was a term…

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Calligraphy in Japan

Known as sho [書], shodō [書道], shosha [書写] or shūji [習字] in the twenty-first century, calligraphy holds an ambiguous and complicated status as art in…

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Zangirimono [Cropped-hair Plays]

In Meiji-era Japan, as part of the reforms to kabuki in response to modernization, playwright Kawatake Mokuami (1816–1893) and actor Onoe Kikugorō V (1844–1903) developed…

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Shinnanga

Shinnanga [新南画], or “neo-nanga,” is a term that came into use during the Taisho period (1912–1926) to describe new interpretations of literati-style painting by Japanese…

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Dongyanghwa

Dongyanghwa (東洋畵, Jap. toyoei), or “Oriental painting”, are brush paintings made with ink or color on either paper or silk. In the Joseon Dynasty, such…

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Japonisme

The term Japonisme refers to the reception of Japanese art products and stylistic forms in Europe and the United States beginning in the second half…

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Japanese Secession

In 1920, a group of Japanese architects interested in Art Nouveu or “Jugenstil” created a society sharing a common approach concerning the future of architecture…

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War Art in Japan

Under Japan’s totalitarian state during World War II, most Japanese artists participated in the war effort. Their activities included producing works commissioned by the state,…