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Shakespeare and Company By Gammel, Irene

DOI: 10.4324/9781135000356-REM1166-1
Published: 01/10/2016
Retrieved: 22 November 2019, from
https://www.rem.routledge.com/articles/shakespeare-and-company

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Abstract

Shakespeare and Company is the legendary English-language lending library and bookstore in Paris, which was founded in 1919 by Sylvia Beach (1887–1962). The shop opened at 8 rue Dupuytren but later relocated to 12 rue de l’Odéon in 1921 opposite the shop of Beach’s long-time business and personal partner, Adrienne Monnier (1892–1955). Shakespeare and Company operated until Beach was taken prisoner in 1941 during the German occupation of France; in 1944, Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961) participated in liberating the store.

Shakespeare and Company is the legendary English-language lending library and bookstore in Paris, which was founded in 1919 by Sylvia Beach (1887–1962). The shop opened at 8 rue Dupuytren but later relocated to 12 rue de l’Odéon in 1921 opposite the shop of Beach’s long-time business and personal partner, Adrienne Monnier (1892–1955). Shakespeare and Company operated until Beach was taken prisoner in 1941 during the German occupation of France; in 1944, Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961) participated in liberating the store.

Renowned for its famous patrons including Hemingway, Gertrude Stein (1874–1946), Ezra Pound (1885–1972), George Antheil (1900–1959) and James Joyce (1882–1941), both Beach and Shakespeare and Company were champions of Modernism, supporting in particular James Joyce’s controversial novel Ulysses, which the latter published in 1922 after the book had been banned in the US. The bookstore served as a promotional platform for Ulysses (detailed in her 1956 memoir Shakespeare and Company and in her letters, which were published posthumously in 2010). Like the expatriate salons of Gertrude Stein and Natalie Barney (1876–1972), Shakespeare and Company is routinely referred to in modernist memoirs, including an idealizing chapter entitled ‘Shakespeare and Company’ in Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast. As Hemingway sums it up: ‘No one that I ever knew was nicer to me’ (1964: 35).

Further Reading

  • Beach, S. (1956) Shakespeare and Company, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

  • Fitch, N. R. (1983) Sylvia Beach and the Lost Generation: A History of the Literary Paris in the Twenties and Thirties, New York: W. W. Norton.

  • Hemingway, E. (1964) A Moveable Feast, New York: Touchstone.

  • Walsh, K. (ed.) (2010) The Letters of Sylvia Beach, New York: Columbia University Press.

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Published

01/10/2016

Article DOI

10.4324/9781135000356-REM1166-1

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Citing this article:

Gammel, Irene. "Shakespeare and Company." The Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism. : Taylor and Francis, 2016. Date Accessed 22 Nov. 2019 https://www.rem.routledge.com/articles/shakespeare-and-company. doi:10.4324/9781135000356-REM1166-1

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