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McCay, Winsor (c.1867–1934) By Ioniță, Maria

DOI: 10.4324/9781135000356-REM2061-1
Published: 15/10/2018
Retrieved: 18 December 2018, from
https://www.rem.routledge.com/articles/mccay-winsor-c-1867-1934

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Winsor McCay (born Zenas Winsor McKay) was an American graphic artist and animator, best known for his Art Nouveau-inflected landmark comic strips Little Nemo in Slumberland (1905–14; 1924–6), Little Sammy Sneeze (1904–6), and Dream of the Rarebit Fiend (1904–25), and his pioneering cartoon shorts Gertie the Dinosaur (1913), How a Mosquito Operates (1912), and Bug Vaudeville (1921). McKay’s early comic strips are notable for their meta-humour, exploiting the idiosyncrasies of their medium: little Sammy’s apocalyptic sneezes, for example, would often demolish the panel borders of the last few frames.

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15/10/2018

Article DOI

10.4324/9781135000356-REM2061-1

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Citing this article:

Ioniță, Maria. "McCay, Winsor (c.1867–1934)." The Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism. : Taylor and Francis, 2016. Date Accessed 18 Dec. 2018 https://www.rem.routledge.com/articles/mccay-winsor-c-1867-1934. doi:10.4324/9781135000356-REM2061-1

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